Canadian Clay Products, Inc.

Canada's Major Bentonite Producer

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What is Bentonite?

Bentonite Sealant

Sealant Systems

Methods

 

 

Products:

 

Canapell
animal feed binder

Geoplug
granular sealant

Canagel
drilling mud

Coregel
high viscosity drill mud

Canafloc
flocculant aid

Ezetrowel
stucco and mortar

Canabond
foundry sand binder

 

SUGGESTED METHODS ON THE APPLICATION OF BENTONITE FOR  SEALING PONDS

The procedures for applying bentonite in the dry form is simple. All that is required is a system that will uniformly spread the bentonite over the surface of the ground, work it into the soil and compact it. 

The Pure Blanket Method 

This method is used when there is a high percentage of water loss through seepage. This method can be done without specialized equipment and without any previous experience in the use of bentonite. 

     1. This method requires that the reservoir be drained. 
     2. The area in question should be prepared adequately by the removal of boulders, vegetation, etc. 
     3. Using a blade or front-end loader, remover 3 to 4 inches of material from the bottom. store this material on the banks for 
     future usage. 
     4. Holes or crevices should be filled with a mixture of five parts soil and one part bentonite. 
     5. Level the reservoir bottom to eliminate any deep furrows or surface irregularities. 
     6. Then lay a continuous blanket of bentonite using a guide line of 1.25 Kgs. per square foot. This will usually suffice most 
     conditions. 
     7. Pack the bentonite and re-apply the material stored on the banks. 
     8. Pack the surface to near original density of the soil. 
     9. Allow the water to flow gently into the reservoir. 

The Mixed Blanket Method 

The bentonite may be applied in the mixed blanket method without specialized equipment an without any previous experience in the use of this material. 

1. This method requires that the reservoir be drained, if applicable. 
2. The area in question should be prepared adequately by the removal of boulders, vegetation, etc. 
 3. Using a blade or front-end loader, remove 3 to 4 inches of material from the bottom. Store this material on the banks for future usage. 
 4. Holes or crevices should should be filled with a mixture of five parts soil and one part bentonite. 
 5. Level the reservoir bottom to eliminate any deep furrows or surface irregularities. 
 6. Mark off the area to be covered into 10 feet by 10 feet (10' x 10') square sections with twine or stakes. 
 7. Then spread the bentonite over the surface evenly. Allow 200-250 Kgs of bentonite per square (10' x 10'). 
8. The bentonite is the worked into the top six inches of soil with a disc or rototiller. By making several passes in each direction, a homogeneous soil/bentonite system is obtained. 
9. It is necessary to compact the soil/bentonite mixture as much as possible. This of course permits the bentonite to be  pressed tightly into the voids in the soil which enhances the efficiency of the seal. 
 10. Re-apply the material stored on the banks evenly over the soil/bentonite liner and pack. 
 11. Allow the water to flow gently into the reservoir. 

In the design of reservoirs it is important to bear in mind certain criteria - the slopes are of critical importance. Side slopes that are too steep - anything steeper than 2 to 1 for example, cannot be effectively handled with bentonite since it is difficult to place and retain the Bentonite on the side slopes. 
The reservoir is now ready for use, provided care has been taken to ensure the areas of potential erosion, such as the incoming water flow, areas of wave erosion or if waders or livestock frequent the pond, have been protected by a rock bed or concrete pads and/or a thick layer of native soil (4" to 6") is covering the soil/bentonite seal. 

Sprinkle Method

If a reservoir cannot be drained, or when only portions of it need treatment, seepage can be halted by sprinkling granular bentonite over the surface of the water. 

   1. Using rope or twine grids, mark off the surface area into 10 foot by 10 foot squares (10' x 10'). 
     2. Scatter the bentonite at the rate of 100 pounds per 10 foot by 10 foot (10' x 10') square. 

Granular bentonite is used because the particles will drop to the bottom before they complete their swelling and gelling action. The bentonite is drawn into the cracks and crevices where leakage takes place, thereby halting the leakage. This method generates a slight cloudiness of the water but is not harmful for drinking purposes. 
In summary, the use of bentonite as a soil sealant is one of the oldest means of sealing water reservoirs. Use of this product is enjoying a resurgence due to recognition of it's favorable economics, ease of application and versatility. Also, being a natural 
material, the bentonite will in no way pollute the stored water or the surrounding environment

ccp@canadianclay.com

P.O. Box 70
Wilcox, Saskatchewan S0G 5E0
Phone: (306)732-2085
Fax: (306)732-2100
Hours: 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.